I care very much about making sure I am consuming a representative and wide range of topics in this area, and so welcome suggestions and recommendations! If you know of anything I ought to be reading, please send it my way.

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61 results
Read during the week of July 19–23, 2021
Sarah Schulman, a rank-and-file member of ACT UP New York since the 1980s, codirects the ACT UP Oral History Project, and wrote a book chronicling the group's activism. She speaks about the history of AIDS/HIV, activism, and ACT UP's role in it. She talks about what worked well for that movement, as well as its shortcomings, and the learnings that contemporary activist movements can take from it.
healthcare, LGBT
Read during the week of July 19–23, 2021
Women who stream on Twitch face enormous amounts of harassment, particularly sexual harassment, enduring an "environment where extreme harassment, rape and death threats, blackmailing, stalking and worse have become regular workplace hazards." Dedicated subreddits have been created to share unintentionally revealing screengrabs and digitally-created porn of these women, and their attempts to have the subreddits and similarly abusive channels removed have largely been futile. One streamer pays $2,500 a month for a firm to help remove sexualized images of her from the internet, and even then platforms usually only remove it when claims are filed based on copyright rather than on sexual harassment grounds. Some viewers have developed parasocial relationships with the female streamers, and some streamers have been targeted with violent threats and both online and in-person stalking.
online harassment, tech industry
Read during the week of July 19–23, 2021
The Internet Archive, a massive online library, has been used by neo-Nazis, antisemites, and other white supremacist and racist groups to host propoganda and incitement. Stalinsky writes about how the organization has done little to prevent usage by extremist and terrorist groups, even after years of knowing of their usage of the site, and claims that it is not responsible for the content shared using its service.
extremism, tech industry
Read during the week of July 12–16, 2021
A company that claims to provide a more socially conscious advertising platform to companies is displaying ads on sites like the Daily Caller and those run by Ben Shapiro. More generally, Wodinsky talks about the motivations behind companies removing ads from far-right sites.
extremism, tech industry
Read during the week of July 12–16, 2021
A recent report from a NYC transit think tank argues that heavy police presence on public transit has exacerbated issues of racism in policing, and is not the best way to promote public safety. The report argues that police should deprioritize enforcing low-level offenses like fare evasion and public sleeping, and increase unarmed personnel to offer aid for those who are unhoused or experiencing mental health issues. According to the report, 90% of people arrested for fare-related offenses by the NYPD from October 2017 to June 2019 were people of color. Furthermore, officers in the NYPD testified they were told to focus on Black and brown fare evaders, and ignore those who were white or Asian.
policing, race
Read during the week of July 12–16, 2021
Cahn explains Twitter's new criteria for verifying accounts, and how it disadvantages activists (particularly of color). According to Cahn, it is much easier to be verified as a journalist, since they only need to submit three recent bylines; activists must satisfy a slew of requirements such as being in the top 0.05% of users in a region, or starting a major hashtag. According to anti-racist economist Kim Crayton, "that blue check automatically means that what you have to say is of value, and without it, particularly if you’re on the front lines, particularly if you’re a Black woman, you’re questioned."
race, tech industry
Read during the week of July 12–16, 2021
Audits at Facebook showed that more than fifty employees misused their access to user data for personal reasons, and that many of the incidents involved male employees looking up women they were interested in romantically. One employee was able to use his access to track down a woman who had rented a new hotel room after a fight, and another was able to show up at a park where a prospective date was socializing with friends. Because of few security measures and auditing, they are unable to know the full scope of data that was improperly accessed in this way.
gender, tech industry
Read during the week of July 5–9, 2021
DiTullio gives a list of five ways to improve online experiences for d/Deaf users: including visual indicators of audio cues, providing text equivalents of audio content, providing sign language, writing with d/Deaf people in mind, and testing designs with d/Deaf people.
accessibility
Read during the week of July 5–9, 2021
Children as young as ten years old are working in American fields for large companies, picking cash crops including tobacco and produce. Although working in tobacco fields holds particular dangers with the exposure to nicotine (which is neurotoxic), all farm labor is particularly dangerous to children due to pesticide exposure, high physical demands, usage of dangerous machinery and tools, exposure to extreme weather, and many other reasons. The issue is in part due to poor regulations, but even existing regulations that would prevent child labor are largely unenforced and ineffective.
children's rights, workers' rights
Read during the week of June 28–July 2, 2021
Black TikTok creators are on strike over cultural appropriation and not being given credit for their content (or having credit stolen) on the TikTok app. White creators have been miscredited as creators of viral TikTok trends, and have benefited from sponsorships and media recognition that belongs to Black creators.
anti-Black racism